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Thinking in New Boxes Featured on ‘The Creative Warriors’ Podcast

It may be human nature to simplify complex issues and put ideas and concepts into “boxes,” but that doesn’t mean there’s not a workaround. Alan joined Jeffrey Shaw on ‘The Creative Warriors’ podcast to explain how to become better prepared for what we can’t predict, and why it’s necessary for business leaders and workers to […]

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Thinking in New Boxes Featured on ‘The Creative Warriors’ Podcast

It may be human nature to simplify complex issues and put ideas and concepts into “boxes,” but that doesn’t mean there’s not a workaround. Alan joined Jeffrey Shaw on ‘The Creative Warriors’ podcast to explain how to become better prepared for what we can’t predict, and why it’s necessary for business leaders and workers to do so. Throughout the podcast, Alan touches on the main points of Thinking in New Boxes, using several real world examples to highlight how you and your team can be terrifically creative – even without a single new idea.

To listen to the podcast, please click here.

How Doing (Almost) Everything You Want Can Boost Creativity

Alan is a champion for embracing – or even creating — constraints to boost creativity. In a recent blog post, he explores the matter further, using artists and creatives as an example of how to find creativity within parameters. Take a Haiku poem, or an improvisational jazz band for examples. In spite of the syllable structure required of a Haiku or the “rules” of improvisational jazz, poets and musicians have managed to created transformative, unique art. The key is understanding the set of boundaries you’re faced with and using those to create and build something new.

Please click here for the full article.

Alan Iny on Understanding–and Then Breaking–the Rules

While the popular opinion on brainstorms may be that most are tedious and unproductive, Alan advocates for keeping them around in a recent blog post. The key, he writes, is to realize the potential of a brainstorm and then allow for some constraints to be in place, rather than the “unconstrained” session that many think is required. He argues that constraints help challenge our perceived thinking and can us reach conclusions we might not have considered.

Please click here to read the full LinkedIn post.

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“Both inspirational and practical—a comprehensive,  step-by-step guide to sharpening one’s wits in order to harness creativity in the workplace.” Peter Gelb General Manager, Metropolitan Opera